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Parshas Tzav The Copper Mizbaiach

This project helps the students visualize the everyday workings of the Temple sacrifices.

Materials: Popsicle sticks, have students bring in a tissue box, dark gold or copper spray paint, black and brown construction paper, tape, and glue.

Click on pictures to enlarge.

Cut out half of top of tissue box leaving a ramp and a square platform. Trace along the sides of the ramp with marker as shown above. Cut along the line that was traced to cut off excess part of the wall of the ramp. Tape side of ramp to ramp.

 

Trace the the wall of the ramps on brown construction paper, do not include the plateau and its walls. Also cut out brown construction paper to cover the surface of the ramp. Before the student glues the paper on to the sides and front of the ramp first fold paper into four little squares to make "horns" for the Mizbaiach and glue them on the corners of the plateau (Mizbaiach). Take 2 popsicle sticks and glue them together to make them long enough to be the staves of the Mizbaiach. See picture below.

Glue staves to each side of the Mizbaiach, not the ramp part, and spray paint the Mizbaiach and not the ramp. Let dry for 10 minutes and break popsicle sticks to make the different wood piles as shown below. Cut 2 circles from the black construction paper. Glue on to the center of the Mizbaiach and make a crease in the other circle so it does not lay flat and glue this on the first circle giving a "3D" effect. See picture below that shows the finished project.

As the Kohen would go up the ramp, the large wood pile on the right is for the sacrifices, the smaller pile on the left is to provide burning fire to burn the incense for the Inner Altar, and the pile in the back is to be kept burning continually, mentioned in the beginning of the Parsha.